pleia2's blog Elizabeth Krumbach Joseph's public journal about Linux, sysadmining, beer, travel, pink gadgets and her life in the city where little cable cars climb halfway to the stars. 2016-09-25T00:16:44Z http://princessleia.com/journal/feed/atom/ WordPress pleia2 http://www.princessleia.com <![CDATA[Beer and trains in Germany]]> http://princessleia.com/journal/?p=11960 2016-09-25T00:16:44Z 2016-09-25T00:16:44Z I spent most of this past week in Germany with the OpenStack Infrastructure and QA teams doing a sprint at the SAP offices in Walldorf, I wrote about it here.

The last (and first!) time I was in Germany was for the same purpose, a sprint, that time in Darmstadt where I snuck in a tiny amount of touristing but due troubles with my gallbladder, I could have any fried foods or beer. Well, I had one beer to celebrate Germany winning the World Cup, but I regretted it big time.

This time was different, finally I could have liters of German beer! And I did. The first night there I even had some wiener schnitzel (fried veal!), even if we were all too tired from our travels to leave the hotel that night. We went out to beer gardens every other night after that, taking in the beautiful late summer weather and enjoying great beers.


Photo in the center by Chris Hoge (source)

But I have a confession to make: I don’t like pilsners and that makes Belgium my favorite beer country in Europe. Still, Germany has quite the title. Fortunately while they are the default, pilsners were not my only option. I indulged in dark lagers and hefeweizens all week. Our evening in Heidelberg I also had an excellent Octoberfest Märzen by Heidelberger, which was probably my favorite beer of the whole trip.

Now I’m getting ahead of myself because I was excited about all the beer. I arrived on Sunday, sadly much later than I had intended. My original flights had been rescheduled so ended up meeting my colleague Clark at the Frankfurt airport around 4PM to catch our trains to Walldorf. The train station is right there in the airport, and clear signs meant a no fuss transfer halfway through our journey to get to the next train. We were on the trains for about an hour before arriving at Wiesloch-Walldorf station. A ten Euro cab ride then got us to the hotel where we met up with several other colleagues for drinks.

Of course we were there to work, so that’s what we spend 9-5 each day doing, but the evenings were ours to explore our little corner of Germany. The first night we just walked into Walldorf after work and enjoyed drinks and food until the sun went down. Walldorf is a very cute little town and the outdoor seating at the beer garden we went to was a wonderful treat, especially since the weather was so warm and clear. We spent Wednesday night in Walldorf too.

More photos from Walldorf here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/pleia2/sets/72157670828593814/

Tuesday night was our big night out. We all headed out to the nearby Heidelberg for a big group dinner. After parking, we had a lovely short walk to the restaurant which took me by a shop that sold post cards! I picked up a trio of cards for my mother and sisters, as I typically do when traveling. The walk also gave a couple of us time to take pictures of the city before the sun went down.

Dinner was at Zum Weissen Schwanen (The White Swan). That was my four beer night.

After the meal several of us took a nice walk around the city a bit more. We got to look up and see the massive, lit up, Heidelberg Castle. It’s a pretty exceptional place, I’d love to properly visit some time. The post cards I sent to family all included the castle.

The drive back to the hotel was fun too. I got a tiny taste of the German autobahn as we got up to 220 kilometers per hour on our way back to the hotel before our exit came up. Woo!

My pile of Heidelberg photos are here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/pleia2/albums/72157674174957385

Thursday morning was my big morning of trains. I flew into Frankfurt like everyone else, but I flew home out of Dusseldorf because it was several hundred dollars cheaper. The problem is Walldorf and Dusseldorf aren’t exactly close, but I could spend a couple hours on European ICE (Inter-City Express) and get there. MJ highly recommended I try it out since I like trains, and with the simplicity of routing he convinced me to take a route from Mannheim all the way to Dusseldorf Airport with one simple connection, which just required walking across the platform.

I’m super thankful he convinced me to take the trains. The ticket wasn’t very expensive and I really do like trains. In addition to being reasonably priced, they’re fast, on time and all the signs were great so I didn’t feel worried about getting lost or ending up in the wrong place. The signs even report where each coach will show up on the platform so I had no trouble figuring out where to stand to get to my assigned seat.

I took a few more pictures while on my train adventure, here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/pleia2/albums/72157670930346613

And so I spent a couple hours on my way to Dusseldorf. I was a bit tired since my first train left the station at 7:36AM, so I mostly just listened to music and stared out the window. My flight out of Dusseldorf was uneventful, and was a direct to San Francisco so I was able to come home to my kitties in the early evening. Unfortunately MJ had left home the day before, so I’ll have to wait until we’re both in Philadelphia next week to see him.

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pleia2 http://www.princessleia.com <![CDATA[OpenStack QA/Infrastructure Meetup in Walldorf]]> http://princessleia.com/journal/?p=11965 2016-09-24T17:35:01Z 2016-09-24T15:30:37Z I spent this week in the lovely town of Walldorf, Germany with about 25 of my OpenStack Quality Assurance and Infrastructure colleagues. We were there for a late-cycle sprint, where we all huddled in a couple of rooms for three days to talk, script and code our way through some challenges that are much easier to tackle when all the key players are in a room together. QA and Infra have always been a good match for an event like this since we’re so tightly linked as things QA works on are supported by and tested in the Continuous Integration system we run.

Our venue this time around were the SAP offices in Walldorf. They graciously donated the space to us for this event, and kept us blessedly fed, hydrated and caffeinated throughout the day.

Each day we enjoyed a lovely walk from and to the hotel many of us stayed at. We lucked out and there wasn’t any rain while we were there so we got to take in the best of late summer weather in Germany. Our walk took us through a corn field, past flowers, gave us a nice glimpse at the town of Walldorf on the other side of the highway and then began in on the approach to the SAP buildings of which there are many.

The first day began with an opening from our host at the SAP offices, Marc Koderer and by the QA project lead Ken’ichi Ohmichi. From there we went through the etherpad for the event to figure out where to begin. A big chunk of the Infrastructure team went to their own room to chat about Zuulv3 and some of the work on Ansible, and a couple of us hung back with the QA team to move some of their work along.

Spending time with the QA folks I learned about future plans for a more useful series of bugday graphs. I also worked with Spencer Krum and Matt Treinish to land a few patches related to the new Firehose service. Firehose is a MQTT-based unified message bus that seeks to encompass all the developer-facing infra alerts and updates in a single stream. This includes job results from Gerrit, updates on bugs from Launchpad, specific logs that are processed by logstash and more. At the beginning of the sprint only Gerrit was feeding into it using germqtt, but by the end of Monday we had Launchpad bugs submitting events over email via lpmqtt. The work was mostly centered around setting up Cyrus with Exim and then configuring the accounts and MX records, and trying to do this all in a way that the rest of the team would be happy with. All seems to have worked out, and at the end of the day Matt sent out an email announcing it: Announcing firehose.openstack.org.

That evening we gathered in the little town of Walldorf to have a couple beers, dinner, and relax in a lovely beer garden for a few hours as the sun went down. It was really nice to catch up with some of my colleagues that I have less day to day contact with. I especially enjoyed catching up with Yolanda and Gema, both of whom I’ve known for years through their past work at Canonical on Ubuntu. The three of us also were walk buddies back to the hotel, before which I demanded a quick photo together.

Tuesday morning we started off by inviting Khai Do over to give a quick demo of the Gerrit verify plugin. Now, Khai is one of us, so what do I mean by “come over”? Of all the places and times in the world, Khai was also at the SAP offices in Walldorf, Germany, but he was there for a Gerrit Hackathon. He brought along another Gerrit contributor and showed us how the verify plugin would replace our somewhat hacked into place Javascript that we currently have on our review pages to give a quick view into the test results. It also offers the ability in the web UI to run rechecks on tests, and will provide a page including history of all results through all the patchsets and queues. They’ve don’t a great job on it, and I was thrilled to see upstream Gerrit working with us to solve some of our problems.


Khai demos the Gerrit verify plugin

After Khai’s little presentation, I plugged my laptop into the projector and brought up the etherpad so we could spend a few minutes going over work that was done on Monday. A Zuulv3 etherpad had been worked on to capture a lot of the work from the Infrastructure team on Monday. Updates were added to our main etherpad about things other people worked on and reviews that were now pending to complete the work.

Groups then split off again, this time I followed most of the rest of the Infrastructure team into a room where we worked on infra-cloud, our infra-spun, fully open source OpenStack deployment that we started running a chunk of our CI tests on a few weeks ago. The key folks working on it gave a quick introduction and then we dove right into debugging some performance problems that were causing failed initial launches. This took us through poking at the Glance image service, rules in Neutron and defaults in the Puppet modules. A fair amount of multi-player (using screen) debugging was done up on the projector as we shifted around options, took the cloud out of the pool of servers for some time, and spent some time debugging individual compute nodes and instances as we watched what they did when they came up for the first time. In addition to our “vanilla” region, Ricardo Carrillo Cruz also made progress that day on getting our “chocolate” region working (next up: strawberry!).

I also was able to take some time on Tuesday to finally get notice and alert notifications going to our new @openstackinfra Twitter account. Monty Taylor had added support for this months ago, but I had just set up the account and written the patches to land it a few days before. We ran into one snafu, but a quick patch (thanks Andreas Jaeger!) got us on our way to automatically sending out our first Tweet. This will be fun, and I can stop being the unofficial Twitter status bot.

That evening we all piled into cars to head over to the nearby city of Heidelberg for dinner and drinks at Zum Weissen Schwanen (The White Swan). This ended up being our big team dinner. Lots of beers, great conversation and catching up on some discussions we didn’t have during the day. I had a really nice time and during our walk back to the car I got to see Heidelberg Castle light up at night as it looms over the city.

Friday kicked off once again at 9AM. For me this day was a lot of talking and chasing down loose ends while I had key people in the room. I also worked on some more Firehose stuff, this time working our way down the path to get logstash also sending data to Firehose. In the midst of which, we embarrassingly brought down our cluster due to failure to quote strings in the config file, but we did get it back online and then more progress was made after everyone got home on Friday. Still, it was good to get part of the way there during the sprint, and we all learned about the amount of logging (in this case, not much!) our tooling for all this MQTT stuff was providing for us to debug. Never hurts to get a bit more familiar with logstash either.

The final evening was spent once again in Walldorf, this time at the restaurant just across the road from the one we went to on Monday. We weren’t there long enough to grow tired of the limited selection, so we all had a lovely time. My early morning to catch a train meant I stuck to a single beer and left shortly after 8PM with a colleague, but that was plenty late for me.


Photo courtesy of Chris Hoge (source)

Huge thanks to Marc and SAP for hosting us. The spaces worked out really well for everything we needed to get done. I also have to say I really enjoyed my time. I work with some amazing people, and come Thursday morning all I could think was “What a great week! But I better get home so I can get back to work.” Hey! This all was work! Also thanks to Jeremy Stanley, our fearless Infrastructure Project Team Leader who sat this sprint out and kept things going on the home front while we were all focused on the sprint.

A few more photos from our sprint here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/pleia2/albums/72157674174936355

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pleia2 http://www.princessleia.com <![CDATA[Kubrick, Typeface to Interface and the Zoo]]> http://princessleia.com/journal/?p=11953 2016-09-17T16:53:10Z 2016-09-17T16:53:10Z I’ve been home for almost three weeks, and now I’m back in an airport. For almost two weeks of that MJ has been on a business trip overseas and I’ve kept myself busy with work, the book release and meeting up with friends and acquaintances. The incredibly ambitious plans I had for this time at home weren’t fully realized, but with everything we have going on I’m kind of glad I was able to spend some time at home.

Mornings have changed some for me during these three weeks. Coming off of trips from Mumbai and Philadelphia in August my sleep schedule was heavily shifted and I decided to take advantage of that by going out running in the mornings. I’d been meaning to get back into it, and my doctor has gotten a bit more insistent of late based on some results from blood work, and she’s right. Instead of doing proper C25K this time I’ve just been doing interval run/walks. I walk about a half mile, do pretty even run/walk for two miles and then a half mile back. It’s not a lot, but I’ll up the difficultly level as I the run/walk I have going feels easier, I have been going out 4-5 days a week and so far it feels great and seems sustainable. Fingers crossed for keeping this up during my next few weeks of travel.

With MJ out of town I’ve made plans with a bunch of local friends. Meals with my friends James, Emma, Sabice and Amanda last week were all a lot of fun and reversed my at home trend of being a hermit. Last weekend I made my way over to to the Stanley Kubrick: The Exhibition. It opened in June and I’ve been interested in going, but sorting out timing and who to go with has been impossible. I finally just went by myself last Saturday after some having some sushi for lunch nearby.

I wouldn’t say I’m a huge Kubrick fan, but I have enjoyed a lot of his work. The exhibit does a really exceptional job showcasing his work, with bright walls throughout and really nicely laid out scripts, cameras, costumes and props from the films. I had just recently seen Eyes Wide Shut again, but the exhibit made me want to go back and watch the rest, and ones I haven’t seen (Lolita, Spartacus). I particularly enjoyed the bits about my favorite movies of his, 2001: A Space Odyssey and Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb.

Some photos from the exhibition here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/pleia2/albums/72157670417890794

I did get out to a movie recently with my friend mct. We saw Complete Unknown which was OK, but not as good as I had hoped. Dinner at a nearby brewery rounded off the evening nicely.

With the whirlwind week of my book release, preparations for the OpenStack QA/Infrastructure sprint (which I’m on my way to now) and other things, I called it a day early on Thursday and met up with my friend Atul for some down time to visit the San Francisco Zoo. He’s been in town for several weeks doing a rotation for work, and we kept missing each other between other plans and my travel schedule. We got to the zoo in time to spend about 90 minutes there before they closed, making it around to most of the exhibits. We got a picture together by the giraffes, but they’ve opened exhibits for the Mexican Wolves and Sifaka lemurs since I last visited! It was fun to finally see both of those. I have some more zoo visits in my future too, hoping to visit the Philadelphia zoo when I’m there next weekend and then the Columbus Zoo after the Ohio LinuxFest in early October.

More zoo pictures here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/pleia2/albums/72157670651372724

Thursday night I met up with my friend Steve to go to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art to see the Typeface to Interface exhibit. This museum is just a block from where I live and the recently reopened after a few years of massive renovations. They’re open until 9PM on Thursdays and we got there around 7:30 to quite the crowd of people, so these later hours seem to be really working for them. Unfortunately I’ve never been much of a fan of modern art. This exhibit interested me though, and I’m really glad I went. It walks you through the beginning of bringing typeface work into the digital realm, presenting you with the IBM Selectric that had replaceable typing element ball for different fonts. You see a variety of digital-inspired posters and other art, the New York Transit Authority Graphics Standards Manual. It was fun going with Steve too, since his UX expertise meant that he actually knew a thing or two about these things out of the geeky computer context I was approaching it with. I think they could have done a bit more to tie the exhibit together, but it’s probably the best one I’ve seen there.

We spent the rest of the evening before closing walking through several of the other galleries in the museum. Nothing really grabbed my interest, and a lot of it I found difficult to understand why it was in a museum. I do understand the aesthetically pleasing nature of much abstract art, but when it starts being really simple (panel of solid magenta) or really eclectic I struggle with understanding the appeal. Dinner was great though, both of us are east coasters by origin and we went to my favorite fish place in SOMA for east coast oysters, mussels, lobster rolls and strawberry shortcake.

Yesterday afternoon MJ got home from his work trip. In the midst of packing and laundry we were able to catch up and spend some precious time together, including a wonderful dinner at Fogo de Chão. Now I’m off to Germany for work. I had time to write this post because the first flight I had was delayed by an astonishing 6 hours, sailing past catching my connection. I’ve now been rebooked on a two stop itinerary that’s getting me in 5 hours later than I had expected. Sadly, this means I’m missing most of the tourist day in Heidelberg I had planned with colleagues on Sunday, but I expect we’ll still be able to get out for drinks in the evening before work on Monday morning.

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pleia2 http://www.princessleia.com <![CDATA[Common OpenStack Deployments released!]]> http://princessleia.com/journal/?p=11927 2016-09-13T18:53:18Z 2016-09-13T18:53:18Z Back in the fall of 2014 I signed a contract with Prentice Hall that began my work on my second book, Common OpenStack Deployments. This was the first book I was writing from scratch and the first where I was the lead author (the first books I was co-author on were the 8th and 9th editions of The Official Ubuntu Book). That contract started me on a nearly two year journey to write a this book about OpenStack, which I talk a lot about here: How the book came to be.

Along the way I recruited my excellent contributing author Matt Fischer, who in addition to his Puppet and OpenStack expertise, shares a history with me in the Ubuntu community and Mystery Science Theater 3000 fandom (he had a letter read on the show once!). In short, he’s pretty awesome.

A lot of work and a lot of people went into making this book a reality, so I’m excited and happy to announce that the book has been officially released as of last week, and yesterday I got my first copy direct from the printer!

As I was putting the finishing touches on it in the spring, the dedication came up. I decided to dedicate the book to the OpenStack community, with a special nod to the Puppet OpenStack team.

Text:

This book is dedicated to the OpenStack community. Of the community, I’d also like to specifically call out the help and support received from the Puppet OpenStack Team, whose work directly laid the foundation for the deployment scenarios in this book.

Huge thanks to everyone who participated in making this book a reality, whether they were diligently testing all of our Puppet manifests, lent their OpenStack or systems administration experience to reviewing or gave me support as I worked my way through the tough parts of the book (my husband was particularly supportive during some of the really grim moments). This is a really major thing for me and I couldn’t have done it without all of you.

I’ll be continuing to write about updates to the book over on the blog that lives on the book’s website: DeploymentsBook.com (RSS). You can also follow updates on Twitter via @deploymentsbook, if that’s your thing.

If you’re interested in getting your hands on a copy, it’s sold by all the usual book sellers and available on Safari. The publisher’s website also routinely has sales and deals, especially if you buy the paper and digital copies together, so keep an eye out. I’ll also be speaking at conferences over the next few months and will be giving out signed copies. Check out my current speaking engagements here to see where I’ll be and I will have a few copies at the upcoming OpenStack Summit in Barcelona.

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pleia2 http://www.princessleia.com <![CDATA[Labor Day Weekend in SF]]> http://princessleia.com/journal/?p=11900 2016-09-06T05:14:06Z 2016-09-06T05:14:06Z Labor Day weekend was a busy one for us this year, as the last weekend MJ and I will be properly spending together for several weeks. Tomorrow he flies off to India for work. He’ll get home mid-day the following Friday, and Saturday morning I’ll be off to Germany. When I get home he’ll be in New York, directly from there we’ll meet at the end of September in Philadelphia for a couple events we have planned with family and friends. October will only be marginally better. But I already have three trips planned and he has at least one.

Saturday morning we went to services and then lunch in Japantown. We had a bit of a medical adventure in the afternoon (all is well) before going off to dinner. MJ started a new job in the beginning of August while I was in Mumbai and we hadn’t had time to properly schedule time to celebrate. After doing some searching as to a nice place to go where getting reservations wasn’t too much of a hassle, we ended up at Luce. They have a Michelin star, reservations were easy to get, they offer a tasting menu Tuesday through Saturday and they’re located just a few blocks from home.

I really enjoyed the ambiance of the restaurant, in spite of it being just off the lobby for the InterContinental. It was spacious and cool, and not very busy for a Saturday night, so we had privacy to talk and didn’t feel crowded. The food was good, with the portions being just right for a tasting menu. There were a lot of fish dishes (menu here), which suited me just fine, both the salmon and the halibut were amazing. I skipped the foie gras, but I did have the duck course, which I’m not usually that keen on, but it was not as tender and rare as is usually served so I was OK with it. The desserts were light, cold and fruity, making for a really nice ending to the meal that wasn’t at all heavy. I also opted for the wine pairing, which MJ dipped into throughout the meal. There was only one red among the selection, with the rest being a series of dry and sweet whites.


Selections from the tasting menu at Luce

Sunday we had a long lunch over at Waterbar on the Embarcadero. We’d been to the restaurant next door, EPIC Steak, many times but this was our first time snagging reservations over at Waterbar. They have an amazing oyster list and the views of the Bay Bridge there are stunning, especially on a day as beautiful as Sunday was.

After lunch we went to the Exploratorium. We’d been there a few times before, so this visit was specifically to see their exhibit Strandbeest: The Dream Machines of Theo Jansen.

I knew about the Strandbeests after seeing a video about them online. These mechanical animals are created by a Dutch artist artist and propel themselves along beaches. He makes them out of a type of plastic piping and has come up with a whole evolution through the various animals he’s made since beginning this work in 1990. They all have names, and the exhibit went through various iterations, some of which they had examples of on exhibit. It talked about the “nerves” and “muscles” that the Strandbeests have, how some are propelled by wind but many also have some mechanisms for limited self-propulsion. We also sat through a 32 minute video they had showing about them.

What was most striking about the exhibit was how strange it all was. This artist devoted a nice chunk of his life to this work and it’s kind of an unusual thing, but the Strandbeest are amazing. They are mechanical but appear so lifelike when they move. All in spite of being so very obviously built with plastic and they wander along beaches. More photos from the exhibit here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/pleia2/albums/72157673332520306

Monday didn’t have so many adventures. As we prepare for all this overlapping travel, we had a lot to get squared away at home and in preparation for our trips (like booking one of them! And packing!). Though we did have time to sneak out to a nice brunch together at the nearby Red Dog Restaurant.

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pleia2 http://www.princessleia.com <![CDATA[Layover “at” Heathrow]]> http://princessleia.com/journal/?p=11894 2016-08-30T15:53:34Z 2016-08-30T15:52:07Z While on my way back from Mumbai several weeks ago I ended up with a seven hour layover at Heathrow. I had planned on just camping out in an airport lounge for that time and catching up on email, open source stuff, work stuff. Then my friend Laura reached out to see if I wanted her to pick me up at the airport so we could escape for a few hours and grab breakfast.

I’d never left the airport on a layover like this, but the chance to catch up with a good friend and being able to take advantage of not needing to plan for a VISA to enter were too good to pass up. Leaving immigration was fun, having to explain that I’d only be out of the airport for five hours. And so, with 7 hours between flights I properly entered England for the second time in my life.

We ended up at Wetherspoon’s pub in Woking for breakfast. Passing on the pork-heavy English breakfast, I had a lovely smoked salmon benedict and some tea.

The weather that morning was beautiful, so after breakfast wandered around town, stopped in a shop or two. We got some more tea (this time with cake!) and generally caught up. It was really nice to chat about our latest career stuff, geek out about open source and fill each other in on our latest life plans.

Definitely the best layover I’ve ever had, I’m super glad I didn’t just stay in the airport lounge! I’ll remind myself of this the next time the opportunity arises.

A handful of other photos here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/pleia2/albums/72157671052472560

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pleia2 http://www.princessleia.com <![CDATA[Local Sights]]> http://princessleia.com/journal/?p=11843 2016-08-28T22:07:59Z 2016-08-28T22:07:59Z I’ve been going running along the Embarcadero here in San Francisco lately. These runs afford me fresh air coming off the bay, stunning views of the bay itself, a chance to run under the beautiful Bay Bridge and down to the AT&T ballpark. I run past palm trees and E-Line street cars, and the weather is cool and clear enough to pretty much do it every day. In short, it sometimes feels like we live in paradise.

Naturally, we like to share that with friends and family who visit. I’ve had a fun year of local touristing as cousins, sisters and friends have been in town visiting. Our favorite place to take them is Fort Baker. It’s almost always less chaotic than the lookout point at the north side of the bridge, and you actually get to walk around a fair amount to get some views of both the Golden Gate Bridge and San Francisco itself. It’s also where I got my head shots done, including the header image I’ve used for this blog for several years. I’m a big fan of the city skyline from there.

Back in April we made a visit up to The Marine Mammal Center, which I wrote about here. We took an alternate route back due to a closed tunnel, and that’s how we ended up looking down at the Golden Gate Bridge from the northwest edge, the one view I hadn’t seen yet. It’s a pretty exceptional ones, getting to see the undeveloped hilly area on the north side and then the San Francisco city skyline in the far distance. I probably could have sat there all day.

Alas, I didn’t have all day. I had only taken the morning off from work and I had to grab a bite before catching the ferry back to San Francisco from Sausalito while MJ took everyone else on to Muir Woods. Now, I’d taken a ferry in the bay before, one to Alcatraz to do some tourist visiting, another to Alameda and back when visiting a potential location for a Partimus computer lab deployment. It’s always been a beautiful ride, but the ride from Sausalito to San Francisco lands into exceptional territory. You get views of several islands, both of San Francisco’s bridges, Alcatraz, Sausalito and the city. I was so happy on this ferry ride that I even had a conversation with a couple who was in town visiting from Canada and answered piles of questions about what we were seeing. This is something that shy, introvert me hardly ever does.

We also take folks up to Twin Peaks. How many cities in the world are there where you can climb a hill and look at downtown? In San Francisco, you can go up to Twin Peaks. It’s breathtaking.

Nice bay, right? We have an ocean too. I spent my youth on the coast of Maine. I didn’t sneak out to late night parties when I was a teenager, I snuck out to go to the park and sit by the ocean. My head clearing spot? The ocean. Needed cheering up when I was depressed? Trip to the ocean. First kiss? Happened right there on the rocks by the ocean. My love for being near the coast is a pretty deep part of who I am.

From the Cliff House on the western side of the city you get some great views of the beach stretching south.

Looking north you can see the ruins of the Sutro Baths that were opened in 1896 and lasted through the middle of the 20th century. Looking beyond to the other side of the golden gate.

Further views we caught this spring are in a pair of albums on Flickr, by month: April and June

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pleia2 http://www.princessleia.com <![CDATA[FOSSCON 2016]]> http://princessleia.com/journal/?p=11874 2016-08-23T21:01:44Z 2016-08-23T21:01:44Z Last week I was in Philadelphia, which was fun and I got to do some Ubuntu stuff but I was actually there to speak at FOSSCON. It’s not the largest open source conference, but it is in my adopted home city of Philadelphia and I have piles of friends, mentors and family there. I love attending FOSSCON because I get to catch up with so many people, making it a very hug-heavy conference. I sadly missed it last year, but I made sure to come out this year.

They also invited me to give a closing keynote. After some back and forth about topics, I ended up with a talk on “Listening to the Needs of Your Global Open Source Community” but more on that later.

I kicked off my morning by visiting my friends at the Ubuntu booth, and meeting up with my OpenStack and HPE colleague Ma Dong who had flown in from Beijing to join us. I made sure we got our picture taken by the beautiful Philadelphia-themed banner that the HPE open source office designed and sent for the event.

At 11AM I gave my regular track talk, “A Tour Of OpenStack Deployment Scenarios.” My goal here was to provide a gentle introduction, with examples, of the basics of OpenStack and how it may be used by organizations. My hope is that the live demos of launching instances from the Horizon web UI and OpenStack client were particularly valuable in making the connection between the concepts of building a cloud the actual tooling you might use. The talk was well-attended and I had some interesting chats later in the day. I learned that a number of the attendees are currently using proprietary cloud offerings and looking for options to in-house some of that.

The demos were very similar to the tutorial I gave at SANOG earlier this month, but the talk format was different. Notes from demos here and slides (219K).


Thanks to Ma Dong for taking a picture during my talk! (source)

For lunch I joined other sponsors at the sponsor lunch over at the wonderful White Dog Cafe just a couple blocks from the venue. Then it was a quick dash back to the venue for Ma Dong’s talk on “Continuous Integration And Delivery For Open Source Development.”

He outlined some of the common mechanisms for CI/CD in open source projects, and how the OpenStack project has solved them for a project that eclipses most others in size, scale and development pace. Obviously it’s a topic I’m incredibly familiar with, but I appreciated his perspective as a contributor who comes from an open source CI background and has now joined us doing QA in OpenStack.


Ma Dong on Open Source CI/CD

After his talk it was also nice to sit down for a bit to chat about some of the latest changes in the OpenStack Infrastructure. We were able to catch up about the status of our Zuul tooling and general direction of some of our other projects and services. The day continued with some chats about Jenkins, Nodepool and how we’ve played around with infrastructure tooling to cover some interesting side cases. It was really fun to meet up with some new folks doing CI things to swap tips and stories.

Just before my keynote I attended the lightning talks for a few minutes, but had to depart early to get set up in the big room.

They keynote on “Listening to the Needs of Your Global Open Source Community” was a completely new talk for me. I wrote the abstract for it a few weeks ago for another conference CFP after the suggestion from my boss. The talk walked through eight tips for facilitating the collection of feedback from your community as one of the project leaders or infrastructure representatives.

  • Provide a simple way for contributors to contact project owners
  • Acknowledge every piece of feedback
  • Stay calm
  • Communicate potential changes and ask for feedback
  • Check in with teams
  • Document your processes
  • Read between the lines
  • Stick to your principles

With each of these, I gave some examples from my work mostly in the Ubuntu and OpenStack communities. Some of the examples were pretty funny, and likely very familiar with any systems folks who are interfacing with users. The Q&A at the end of the presentation was particularly interesting, I was very focused on open source projects since that’s where my expertise lies, but members of the audience felt that my suggestions were more broadly applicable. In those moments after my talk I was invited to speak on a podcast and encouraged to write a series of articles related to my talk. Now I’m aiming for writing some OpenSource.com content on over the next couple weeks.

Slides from the talk are here (7.3M pdf).


And thanks to Josh, José, Vincent and Nathan for snapping some photos of the talk too!

The conference wound down and following the keynote with a raffle and we then went our separate ways. For me, it was time for spending time with friends over a martini.

A handful of other photos from the conference here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/pleia2/albums/72157671843605132

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pleia2 http://www.princessleia.com <![CDATA[Wandering around Philadelphia]]> http://princessleia.com/journal/?p=11861 2016-08-23T02:38:53Z 2016-08-23T02:35:27Z Philadelphia is my figurative (and may soon be literal…) second home. Visits are always filled with activities, events, friends and family. This trip was a considerably less structured. I flew in several days before the conference I was attending and stayed in my friend’s guest room, and didn’t take much time off from work, instead working from a couch most of the week with my little dog friend Blackie.

I did have some time for adventuring throughout the week though, taking a day off to check out The Science Behind Pixar exhibit down at The Franklin Institute with a friend. On our way down we stopped at Pudge’s in Conshohocken to satisfy my chicken cheesesteak craving. It hit the spot.

Then we were off to the city! The premise of the exhibit seemed to be trying to encourage youth into STEM fields by way of the creative processes and interesting jobs at a company like Pixar. As such, they walked you through various phases of production of Pixar films and have hands-on exhibits that let you simply play around with the themes of what professionals in the industry do. It’s probably a good idea to encourage interest, even if a museum exhibit can’t begin to tackle the complexity of these fields, as a technologist I agree that the work is ultimately fun and exciting.

But let’s be honest, I’m an adult who already has an STEM career and I’ve been a Pixar fan since the beginning. I was there so I could get selfies with Wall-E (and Buzz, Sully and Mike, Edna Mode, Dory…).

A few more photos from the exhibit here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/pleia2/albums/72157671629547292

We had the whole afternoon, so I also got to see the Lost Egypt exhibit, which was fun to see after the Egypt exhibit I saw at de Young last month. We went to a couple planetarium shows and also got all the nostalgia on as I revisited all the standing exhibits. Like the trains. I love the trains. The Franklin Institute is definitely one of my favorite museums.

That evening I also got to check out the new Hive76 location. The resurgence of hackerspaces had just started when I left Philly, and while I was never super involved, I did host a few “PLUG into Hive” meetings there when I was coordinating the LUG and had friends at Hive. It was nice getting to see their new space. After dinner I had the amusing experience of going to catch Pokémon in a park after dark, along with several other folks who were there for the same reason. There really is something to be said for a game that gets people out of their house at night to go for walks and socialize over augmented reality. Even if I didn’t catch any new Pokémon. Hah!

Wednesday and Thursday nights I spent time with my best buddies Danita and Crissi. Dinner, drinks, lots of good chatting. It had absolutely been too much time since we’d spend time together, spending time catching up was just the thing I needed. I’ll have to make sure I don’t let so much time pass between getting together in the future.

More photos from various wanderings this past week (including dinosaurs!) here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/pleia2/albums/72157671629567332

And then MJ and I spent Friday and Sunday on a secret mission before flying home. I’ll write more about that once it becomes unclassified.

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pleia2 http://www.princessleia.com <![CDATA[Ubuntu in Philadelphia]]> http://princessleia.com/journal/?p=11853 2016-08-22T19:53:05Z 2016-08-22T19:53:05Z Last week I traveled to Philadelphia to spend some time with friends and speak at FOSSCON. While I was there, I noticed a Philadelphia area Linux Users Group (PLUG) meeting would land during that week and decided to propose a talk on Ubuntu 16.04.

But first I happened to be out getting my nails done with a friend on Sunday before my talk. Since I was there, I decided to Ubuntu theme things up again. Drawing freehand, the manicurist gave me some lovely Ubuntu logos.

Girly nails aside, that’s how I ended up at The ATS Group on Monday evening for a PLUG West meeting. They had a very nice welcome sign for the group. Danita and I arrived shortly after 7PM for the Q&A portion of the meeting. This pre-presentation time gave me the opportunity to pass around my BQ Aquaris M10 tablet running Ubuntu. After the first unceremonious pass, I sent it around a second time with more of an introduction, and the Bluetooth keyboard and mouse combo so people could see convergence in action by switching between the tablet and desktop view. Unlike my previous presentations, I was traveling so I didn’t have my bag of laptops and extra tablet, so that was the extent of the demos.

The meeting was very well attended and the talk went well. It was nice to have folks chiming in on a few of the topics (like the transition to systemd) and there were good questions. I also was able to give away a copy of our The Official Ubuntu Book, 9th Edition to an attendee who was new to Ubuntu.

Keith C. Perry shared a video of the talk on G+ here. Slides are similar to past talks, but I added a couple since I was presenting on a Xubuntu system (rather than Ubuntu) and didn’t have pure Ubuntu demos available: slides (7.6M PDF, lots of screenshots).

After the meeting we all had an enjoyable time at The Office, which I hadn’t been to since moving away from Philadelphia almost seven years ago.

Thanks again to everyone who came out, it was nice to meet a few new folks and catch up with a bunch of people I haven’t seen in several years.

Saturday was FOSSCON! The Ubuntu Pennsylvania LoCo team showed up to have a booth, staffed by long time LoCo member Randy Gold.

They had Ubuntu demos, giveaways from the Ubuntu conference pack (lanyards, USB sticks, pins) and I dropped off a copy of the Ubuntu book for people to browse, along with some discount coupons for folks who wanted to buy it. My Ubuntu tablet also spent time at the table so people could play around with that.


Thanks to Randy for the booth photo!

At the conference closing, we had three Ubuntu books to raffle off! They seemed to go to people who appreciated them and since both José and I attended the conference, the raffle winners had 2/3 of the authors there to sign the books.


My co-author, José Antonio Rey, signing a copy of our book!
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